Houses by Erb Santiago

A small and simple home that inspires

Katherine Rañeses Katherine Rañeses

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Eclectic architecture isn't for everybody, but if you're the type that can appreciate unique-looking buildings, or are a big fan of The Sims, then this is for you. Eclecticism is a nineteenth and twentieth-century architectural style in which a single piece of work incorporates a mixture of elements from previous historical styles to create something that is new and original. In architecture and interior design, these elements may include structural features, furniture, decorative motives, distinct historical ornament, traditional cultural motifs or styles from other countries, with the mixture usually chosen based on its suitability to the project and overall aesthetic value.

Eclecticism also usually contain symbols that are meaningful to the owner, and mixed with a fundamental sense of style, that is exactly what you get when you explore this simple yet unique property by ERB Santiago.

Front of house

Looking at the structure from one angle, it looks almost like a square house with a lot of different sized windows, and a garage roof made up of sticks, giving the house a kind of modern adobe house look. You can appreciate the lush green landscape, with only the low wooden fence determining the property line.

Side view

From another angle, you can see that there is more than meets the eye with this special piece of property. Instead of the square-ish building you'd realize that it goes further on in the back, and subject to a series of gaps, almost like carton boxes lined up together. The windows are long slits along the side of the building, reminiscent of arrowslits in medieval castles. 

The back

The veranda on the other end of the property features the traditional thatched roof again—or azotea de la paja - found in old Spanish villas. Big industrial windows and clean lines bring the design into the 21st century, and the space is the perfect spot to admire the vast garden which could be perfect for a game of football on hot, summer days.

The sala

The traditional Spanish influence ends at the facade, with the living room keeping to an even simpler aesthetic with polished concrete floors and plain white walls, the recessed LED lights not drawing much attention to the ceiling, keeping the space looking open and spacious, while decor with an African theme using tribal symbols and ornaments adorn the room.

Bedroom

The windows that we saw on the outside, remind me a little of portholes that you'd find on cruise ships, bringing in enough light into the room with the added benefit of being small enough to keep one's privacy without the need for curtains. 

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